Guide

Eleven restaurants where you can take your dog

Celebrations usually involve food and family which, for many of us, extends to our furry friends. We love our dogs so much that our lives sometimes revolve more around their routines than our own. So it’s great when we find a restaurant that happily welcomes in our precious pooches and we can enjoy a family dinner with every member of the pack.

We have put together a list of top-notch restaurants that allow well-behaved dogs inside. Belzan, Bundobust, Hearth of the Ram, Parker’s Arms and The Freemasons at Wiswell have all told us they love and welcome your dogs, almost wagging their own tails as they did so.

Others like The Moorcock, The White Hart, The Hinchcliffe Arms and The Roebuck – who even serve a stock-based doggy beer – have areas where you can dine with your best friend any time, either in the pub section or on designated tables – best to call and check beforehand that they can accommodate you and Fido that day.

Lastly, you can bring your bow-wow for chow at The White Swan at Fence during the week and on specific tables (book in advance to be safe) and Roski in Liverpool at lunchtime.

NOTE- Of course, all restaurants should allow guide dogs and most of the ones we contacted said these were the exception to their no-pets rule. Some we haven’t included in the guide; for instance, Maray Dockside, El Gato Negro and The Cartford Inn allow dogs to join outside tables.

  • 15 Book Now Lancashire

    Parker’s Arms

    European

    Homely pub, serving and baking extraordinary, modern European food. This tastefully renovated pub and restaurant has everything the worldly gourmand could desire, with none of the faff and pretension that usually comes with that title. Wines and beers are plucked from the world’s finest makers while food is served in the clean lines of the restaurant and woody bar. A wonderful place to come and recharge the batteries, in one of the country’s overlooked corners.

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  • Book Now Lancashire

    The Hearth of the Ram

    British

    Extraordinary pub food reinventing classic local flavours. Enjoy confident cooking in a historic, 200-year-old pub on the cusp of the countryside. Marketing is a little like the Drunken Duck; comfort and service are pushed to the fore while fine, French techniques meet local flavours on a seductive menu. The owners are Scots, Euan and Dena Watkins, with more than 20 years’ experience in the trade. The wine list is small but spot on, and whisky stands out.

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  • 10 Book Now Lancashire

    The Freemasons at Wiswell

    British

    Cooking goes from strength to strength at this adventurous food pub. Roaring fires, cast-iron fireplaces and pictures of fantastically proportioned livestock lend a cosy vibe to the renovated cottages which make up what’s often been described as the original gastropub. But don’t let that fool you into thinking this is a static operation. Steven Smith’s menu sees powerful flavours handled with ease. Expect something really special.

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  • Bundobust food
    23 Book Now Manchester

    Bundobust

    Indian subcontinent

    Veggie Bollywood blockbuster serving small plates and the best in beer. Bundobust is a huge beer hall serving tens of craft beers from a massive bar in the heart of Manchester’s Piccadilly Gardens. It also happened to win Restaurant of the Year at the 2017 Manchester Food and Drink Festival awards.

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  • Book Now Liverpool

    Belzan

    European

    Following a punchy review by Confidential’s Deanna Thomas – and, latterly, the Guardian’s Grace Dent – it has been hard to secure a table at Liverpool’s maverick newcomer Belzan. The self-described ‘neo-bistro’ opened in 2018, the baby of a £20,000 Kickstarter campaign by the owners of Duke Street cocktail emporium Filter and Fox.

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  • 4 Book Now Yorkshire

    The Moorcock

    Modern British

    An astonishing arrival on the Northern culinary scene. This unassuming pub serves foraged and regional ingredients in thrilling configurations, catching the eye of national food critics and diners alike. The menu could include crispy fish skin and tarts of foraged berries, wood-roasted goat, leeks with new season garlic and pickled plums, homemade black pudding, roasted beeswax ice cream and cascades of herbs and leaves that go way beyond plate dressing.

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  • Book Now Manchester

    The White Hart at Lydgate

    Modern British

    Rustic dining pub with excellent reputation and wine list. Located seven hundred feet above sea level, where Saddleworth Moor starts, the restaurant is located in an impressive former coaching house, and it’s a place for all; a composite experience including a restaurant and brasserie with two AA rosettes, pub, function areas and a boutique hotel. There are many cosy seating areas: low ceilings, beams, exposed stone walls and big fireplaces. Head chef Mike Shaw’s cooking, meanwhile, is all about local ingredients cooked with flair. Cheese is a strength with French and British options, while dessert could include duck egg custard tart, a passionfruit cheesecake, coconut yoghurt with chocolate and eucalyptus, or a pear tart tatin with liquorice ice cream.

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  • Book Now Yorkshire

    The Hinchcliffe Arms

    British

    Full-on British food delivered with flair and imagination. Putting the goodness of earth, river and sea on a plate, head chef and game expert Robert Owen Brown possesses both skill and character to turn locally caught creatures into the kind of hearty dishes you’ll really want to eat. Former head chef at The Bridge, ROB was an early adopters of the Manchester Egg (a Scotch Egg variant with black pudding wrapped around a pickled egg). Expect equally flavour-packed cooking here – crispy black pudding potato cake with tarragon sauce, for example, or hickory-smoked corn-fed chicken salad with parsnip crisps, alongside mains which celebrate traditional British cuisine. Whole roast grouse with game chips, and bread sauce, Cornish octopus with homemade saffron mayo, loin of local lamb or pheasant breast are typical. Desserts such as bread and butter pudding, ROB’s signature Vimto trifle, and selection of chocolate mousses, top off a hearty feast – and there’s a solid wine list too. Beers are supplied by Mancunian brewers JW Lees, little surprise give the impact that Owen Brown has made in the city. And the setting is perfect too; a real country pub, dating back to 1850 with open fires. What more could you want?

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  • Book Now Cheshire

    The Roebuck

    British

    Multi-award-winning pub in the Cheshire countryside. Described as ‘classic bistro food’ the menu covers all your pub essentials from fresh, stone-baked pizzas to sharing boards (the ‘fromagerie board’ for examples include Taleggio, Comte, Brie and gorgonzola – there’s no standing on ceremony here), via small plates (crab mayo and crushed avocado with chilli, for example, crispy confit duck rolls and… Thai spiced chicken wings).

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  • 11 Book Now Lancashire

    The White Swan at Fence

    British

    Some folk in the village stlll refer to it as “The Mucky Duck’ and you can still order a pint of Timothy Taylor’s at its very pubby bar but over the past three years the Swan has established itself as a destination fine dining spot thanks to 20something chef Tom Parker. From up the road in Burnley, at 16 he begged a start at Michelin-starred Northcote, becoming a protégé of Lisa Allen and scooping a Young Chef of the Year award. That prodigious talent is evident throughout the short menus here, which change daily on the back of produce turning up on his doorstep.

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  • 14 Book Now Liverpool

    Roski

    Modern British

    Wild child of a restaurant from the former Michelin star winning Masterchef winner. Roski may well bring Liverpool its first Michelin star, thanks to the balls-out cooking of former MasterChef: The Professionals winner, Anton Piotrowski. Gracious in joint victory with Keri Moss, he substantiated his credentials at Devon’s Treby Arms pub earning a Michelin star after being told it could never happen. His Liverpool restaurant takes on the former Pushka site and it’s a simple, elegant space. White tablecloths and gentle lighting places the focus firmly on the food. Food-wise, choose from a selection of five and seven course tasting menus, littered with invention. Dishes include shards of dehydrated carrot flecked with Thai flavours, and Piotrowski’s take on Liverpool’s signature dish, scouse, here taking the form of a tower topped with crisped fermented turnip, sprinkled with parsley dust, a layer of smoked vegetables, locally bred beef brisket aged for 100 days, infused with Norwegian spices and caramelised onion and served with beef knuckle marrow gravy. Tiny, crisp ants are served with the seared scallop, and names are fun too: Olympic Breakfast, for example and Piotroski’s Gone Carrots (his Masterchef winning dish), actually a take carrot cake, presented in a tiny plastic flowerpot, with crumbly chocolate soil and a real baby carrot. Dig into the soft, light carroty sponge for layers of cream. Wines are worldly. Thrilling stuff.

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