Powered by Confidentials.com Search Subscribe
Search Subscribe
Guide

Indie in the city: Manchester’s independent restaurants

Manchester Central

Restaurants have been hit hard over the past couple of years, with more to come in the months ahead. That’s why it’s so important to support independent restaurants whenever you can.

With that in mind, we have handpicked some of our favourite Manchester indies we think you should check out next time you’re in town. For market-fresh fish, Street Urchin is the place to go. Its home at the back of the Northern Quarter is a testament to its indie status.

For a Japanese-style noodle bar experience Tokyo Ramen, also in The Northern Quarter can whip up handmade noodles to order. Or if it’s more of an Italian flavour you need, The Pasta Factory makes every dish from scratch with authentic ingredients.

Scroll down the list to find real favours from real people from all over the world in a celebration of Manchester’s independents.

  • Book Now Manchester City Centre

    Another Hand

    Restaurant - British

    From the team that brought you 3 Hands Deli, Another Hand opened in February 2022 in the unit just next door. With a sleek new look, the casual dining restaurant brings brunch, lunch and a relaxed dining experience to Deansgate Mews, Manchester’s newest hotspot.

    More details
  • Noodles and vegetables at Blue Eyed Panda Manchester
    Ancoats

    Blue Eyed Panda

    Restaurant - Chinese

    Whether it’s go-hot-or-go-home Chinese fayre you’re after or something a little less tastebud blowing, Ancoats indie Blue Eyed Panda delivers on both fronts. While from the outside, the restaurant doesn’t look much, there’s nothing bland about the food, which has tons of kerb appeal – and packs plenty of flavour to boot. 

    More details
  • Inside Elnecot, one of the new generation of restaurants in Ancoats, Manchester.
    Ancoats

    Elnecot

    Restaurant - European

    Named after the first recorded name for Ancoats, Elnecot (meaning ‘lonely cottages’) takes its influence from historical cooking methods with lots of fermenting, a little foraging and a few nose-to-tail dishes.

    More details
  • El Rincon de Rafa Tapas Manchester
    Manchester City Centre

    El Rincon de Rafa

    Restaurant - Spanish

    This Manchester institution was a much-respected destination for Spanish food long before tapas became a common sight in the city centre.

    More details
  • The Pasta Factory, Manchester
    Book Now Northern Quarter

    The Pasta Factory

    Restaurant - Italian

    The group of friends behind The Pasta Factory’s story originally hail from Turin in the northern region of Piedmont, so this is the place for authentic Italian food full of flavour, with dishes created from scratch using only the best fresh ingredients in season.

    More details
  • An example of the dishes at Pho Cue restaurant in Manchester China Town
    Chinatown

    Pho Cue

    Restaurant - Vietnamese

    “The food speaks for itself,” says Cue Tran, owner of the Pho Cue Vietnamese kitchen, whose aim is to take the authentic street food dishes of his home country and give them a modern “Instagrammable” twist while retaining their flavour, freshness and family traditions.

    More details
  • Pierogi dumpling from Platzki restaurant, Deansgate Manchester
    Book Now Manchester City Centre

    Platzki

    Restaurant - European

    Modern Polish cuisine is what’s on offer at Platzki, one of the first restaurants to open at Deansgate Mews back in 2018.

    More details
  • A prawn dish at Siam Smiles Thai Restaurant in Manchester
    Book Now Manchester City Centre

    Siam Smiles

    Restaurant - Thai

    Siam Smiles is famous amongst foodies in the city. Once a tiny café squeezed in next to some supermarket shelves in Chinatown, it now has (slightly) bigger premises but the same redoubtable chef manning the wok. Chef May is a bit of a legend on the Manchester food scene because everyone loves a story. She only took up cooking when the chef left and her professional training came down to watching YouTube videos of Thai cooks. Nevertheless, the food tastes like it has been years in the perfecting – and in a way it has: real recipes passed down from generation to generation and then sent out into the world via the magic medium of Internet.

    More details
  • Floral outdoor display at Sicilian NQ Manchester
    Book Now Northern Quarter

    Sicilian NQ

    Restaurant - Italian

    Based in the Northern Quarter, this friendly neighbourhood bistro and bar is the place to avanti if it’s a taste of traditional Sicily you fancy – from authentic street food snacks through big plates of pasta to desserts and holiday memory gelato, eat in or take away.

    More details
  • The leafy interior at Street Urchin Restaurant, Manchester
    Book Now Ancoats

    Street Urchin

    Restaurant - Modern British

    For Street Urchin, think less about raggedy kids hanging about Victorian mills (although it is on the edge of Ancoats) and more about seafood delicacies. Fish is plentiful on the menu at this English market diner, although meat gets a look-in too.

    More details
  • Thai Kitchen No.6, Manchester, pork and rice
    Book Now Manchester City Centre

    Thai Kitchen No.6

    Restaurant - Thai

    Thai Kitchen No.6 is a real family restaurant. That means it’s a homespun affair without the sheen of some other South East Asian venues in Manchester.

    But that doesn’t matter. There are plenty of decadent palaces around if that’s what you’re after. At Thai Kitchen No.6 the interior is basic but there’s a warm welcome and the sort of food eaten by families all over Thailand although they’ve turned the spiky heat down for British palates – perhaps a notch too far if you’re looking for the authentic experience.

    There’s a focus on salads with real Thai staples that don’t always make the journey to Western menus.

    More details
  • Tokyo Ramen, manchester
    Book Now Northern Quarter

    Tokyo Ramen

    Restaurant - Japanese

    Spartan and stripped back is the only description for Tokyo Ramen – and that’s both the menu and the restaurant itself. With barely enough space to swing a noodle, the place only accommodates 20 walk-ins. It’s not a sociable place, more a utilitarian slurping station.

    As it is all about the food, is it any good? In a word, yes. The selection of drinks is limited, even the word ‘selection’ seems like too generous a term and the menu is brief and to the point. It’s the ramen which are the one-pot wonders with Tokyo Ramen billing itself as ‘Manchester’s #1 ramen shop’. It’s all in the broth – in this case 10 hour chicken bone broth, or mushroom dashi in the vegan option – which lifts the food to Mt. Fuji-like heights.

    More details
Close
Close splash advert